1. Alle Posts mit dem Tag "sculpture"

  2. After Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, and Joana Vasconcelos, South Korean minimalist painter and sculptor Lee Ufan is this summer’s guest artist in Versailles. Ten new works, described as “intense and silent,” have been placed throughout the palace and gardens. 

    • 2 months ago, 
    • 120 notes
  3. South Korean minimalist painter and sculptor Lee Ufan is this summer’s guest artist in Versailles. Ten new works, described as “intense and silent,” have been placed throughout the palace and gardens. Don’t miss this show if you happen to vacation in Paris. 

    • 2 months ago, 
    • 76 notes
  4. As if we needed another reason to visit the Getty, the museum just acquired a new, rare sculpture by August Rodin. 

    • 2 months ago, 
    • 104 notes
  5. Spotlight: Francesco Somaini

    We would like to take a moment to introduce the Italian sculptor Francesco Somaini, who was born in Lomazzo (Como) in August of 1926. 

    After taking part in the 1950 Venice Biennale for the first time and a period of reflection upon the experiences of the international contemporary sculpture, he became interested in abstractionism and, in the mid 1950s, achieved an autonomy of language with sculptures realized in “ferric conglomerate” (Canto Aperto, Forza del nascere) -  art work that marked his entrance  in the Concrete Art Movement and preluded the great informal period.

    Now, the Francesco Somaini Archive is creating a beautiful catalogue on the artist’s extensive oeuvre - We are very excited the see it in its completed form!

    • 7 months ago, 
    • 15 notes
  6. Robert Graham: Early Works

    "[I am] trying to make exactly what I see in front of me." - Robert Graham

    This evening, Los Angeles art gallery Kayne Griffin Corcoran is debuting the gallery’s first exhibition of work by famed sculptor Robert Graham (1938-2008).

    Working initially from photographs pulled from magazines of the day, Graham produced meticulously detailed replicas of his human subjects. As his practice progressed, Graham moved toward a more sober inquiry into the nature of the female form.

    Despite the inherent sensuality of his subjects, Graham’s interest lay in portraiture rather than erotic reflection. Confronted by a Graham figure, the viewer is caught between the desire to embrace and the impulse to worship and, more than anything else, becomes aware of the subtle, underlying ambiguities that give Robert Graham’s statues their own particular sense of life.

    Robert Graham: Early Work: 1969-1974 opens tonight, Jan 14, and runs through March 8, 2014 at Kayne Griffin Corcoran

    • 7 months ago, 
    • 32 notes
  7. To look is one thing, to see is another thing; to see is very difficult, normally; to look is to try to see. I have looked and I hope I have seen.

    Eduardo Chillida

    • 7 months ago, 
    • 132 notes
  8. "To look is one thing, to see is another thing; to see is very difficult, normally; to look is to try to see. I have looked and I hope I have seen."

    Regarded one of the most important Spanish sculptors of the 20th century, Eduardo Chillida was born on this day in 1924 in in San Sebastían. Much of Chillida’s work is inspired by his Basque upbringing, and many of his sculptures have titles in the Basque language, Euskera.

    • 7 months ago, 
    • 67 notes
  9. In The Studio With Jean Charasse

    "It was the discovery of Pablo Picasso that first influenced my work. I then discovered Wilfredo Lam, Paul Klee, and Piet Mondrian." Jean Charasse

    We sat down with French artist Jean Charasse to chat about his artistic process, his influences, and his current projects. 

    Enjoy the candid and revealing interview. 

     

    • 9 months ago, 
    • 22 notes
  10. Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.

    Auguste Rodin

    • 9 months ago, 
    • 4,202 notes
  11. Remembering Rodin

    "Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely." 

    Auguste Rodin, the father of Modern sculpture, was born on this day in 1840 in Paris. 

    In a career that spanned the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Rodin introduced innovative practices that paved the way for modern sculpture. Celebrated for his expressive Modern depictions of the human form in bronze and other materials, Rodin was deeply inspired by tradition yet rebelled against its idealized forms

    His work The Thinker (pictured) remains one of the most recognized sculptures to date. 

    • 9 months ago, 
    • 99 notes
  12. The Gugg’s Eggplant

    An Eggplant phone is now part of the Guggenheim's contemporary collection. In the museum's words, Margaret Lee's "Eggplant (phone) is a hybrid object that is neither an eggplant nor a phone—it is a meticulously crafted, hand-painted, and plaster-casted sculpture.” 

    • 1 year ago, 
    • 115 notes
  13. Remembering Robert Graham

    "[I am] trying to make exactly what I see in front of me."

    —Robert Graham

    Born on this day in 1938 in Mexico City, Robert Graham was a sculptor best known for his public monuments and female nudes. After moving to Venice, CA, he soon began casting single bodies in bronze, and working on a monumental scale. In 1984, he completed Olympic Gateway for the Memorial Coliseum at the Olympic Games of that year. Other civic monuments include a life-size figure of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1997) for the Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C. and a monument of jazz composer Duke Ellington (1997).

    Confronted by a Graham figure, the viewer is caught between the desire to embrace and the impulse to worship. Furthermore, the viewer becomes aware of the subtle ambiguities that give Graham’s statues their own particular sense of life.

    Pictured: Robert Graham with his wife Anjelica Huston 

    • 1 year ago, 
    • 26 notes
  14. Breakfast with Orly Genger

    Every month, we partner with ArtTable for their Artists’ Talk Series. 

    This month, we sat down with Brooklyn-based sculptor Orly Genger, who is famed for her large-scale, hand-crocheted installations. Her latest work is on view in Madison Square Park through September 8, and features thousands of yards of rope, painted and shaped to transform the flat landscape into a dynamic, three-dimensional visual experience.

    Watch Orly talk about her unique artistic process.

    • 1 year ago, 
    • 27 notes
  15. Purity

    Silver used to be mined in Combe Martin where I live. It’s dreamy, otherworldly, but also sensuous and sexy…” -Damien Hirst.

    Hirst used silver to create this sculpture of a pregnant woman. This surreal, scientifically rendered figure depicts the flesh peeled back to reveal the inner muscle, bone, and fetal structure of the woman.

    • 1 year ago, 
    • 62 notes
  16. Meeting Orly Genger

    “If I could put my body into my work, that would be the ultimate. -Orly Genger. 

    Over the past few years, Genger has become well-known for her incredible large-scale installations, created from seemingly endless coils of rope. The artist crochets shapes into works that recall Modern masterworks.

    Made of 1.4 million feet of hand-crocheted lobster-fishing rope—enough to span the length of Manhattan nearly 20 times over—her latest installation, Red, Yellow and Blue, is on view in Madison Square Park until September. Don’t miss it!

    The artist grew up in New York City with parents who collected Modern Art. She later attended Brown University, where she discovered and fell in love with sculpture. 

    Now, we’re very excited to host Orly Genger for an ArtTable breakfast at our office on June 19, 2013! ArtTable was founded in 1980 and is dedicated to the visual arts and to advancing women’s leadership in the field. 

    • 1 year ago, 
    • 82 notes